Institute of Neurological Recovery Blog

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Jan Sanders and Mary Jean Moore discuss their treatment results in the Daily Dunklin Democrat

Dear Friends,
The Daily Dunklin Democrat in Kennett, Missouri has today (February 17, 2013) published a wonderful new story about the results of TransBarrier®  treatment at the INR PLLC in Boca Raton following stroke.  To read the whole story please visit the story on the webpage of the Daily Dunklin Democrat (click here).
Please also see:
February 4, 2012 article in The Recorder, Greenfield, Massachusetts:

http://www.recorder.com/home/4088414-95/krug-treatment-stroke-able

 

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February 4, 2013 article in Massachusetts newspaper discusses new stroke treatment

February 4, 2012 article in The Recorder, Greenfield, Massachusetts:

http://www.recorder.com/home/4088414-95/krug-treatment-stroke-able

New treatment gives stroke victim hope

Recorder/Paul Franz<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
Rodney Krug, 91, of Bernardston at the Bernardston Senior Center.Recorder/Paul Franz Rodney Krug, 91, of Bernardston at the Bernardston Senior Center.
By DAVID RAINVILLE Recorder Staff

Sunday, February 3, 2013
(Published in print: Monday, February 4, 2013)
For the full article, please go to:http://www.recorder.com/home/4088414-95/krug-treatment-stroke-able

 

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Science News: New pathology study: Inflammation persists for years after a single traumatic brain injury

Brain. 2013 Jan;136(Pt 1):28-42. doi: 10.1093/brain/aws322.
Inflammation and white matter degeneration persist for years after a single traumatic brain injury.
Johnson VEStewart JEBegbie FDTrojanowski JQSmith DHStewart W.

Source

Penn Centre for Brain Injury and Repair and Department of Neurosurgery, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Abstract

A single traumatic brain injury is associated with an increased risk of dementia and, in a proportion of patients surviving a year or more from injury, the development of hallmark Alzheimer’s disease-like pathologies. However, the pathological processes linking traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative disease remain poorly understood. Growing evidence supports a role for neuroinflammation in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. In contrast, little is known about the neuroinflammatory response to brain injury and, in particular, its temporal dynamics and any potential role in neurodegeneration. Cases of traumatic brain injury with survivals ranging from 10 h to 47 years post injury (n = 52) and age-matched, uninjured control subjects (n = 44) were selected from the Glasgow Traumatic Brain Injury archive. From these, sections of the corpus callosum and adjacent parasaggital cortex were examined for microglial density and morphology, and for indices of white matter pathology and integrity. With survival of ?3 months from injury, cases withtraumatic brain injury frequently displayed extensive, densely packed, reactive microglia (CR3/43- and/or CD68-immunoreactive), a pathology not seen in control subjects or acutely injured cases. Of particular note, these reactive microglia were present in 28% of cases with survival of >1 year and up to 18 years post-trauma. In cases displaying this inflammatory pathology, evidence of ongoing white matter degradation could also be observed. Moreover, there was a 25% reduction in the corpus callosum thickness with survival >1 year post-injury. These data present striking evidence of persistent inflammation and ongoing white matter degeneration for many years after just a single traumatic brain injury in humans. Future studies to determine whether inflammation occurs in response to or, conversely, promotes white matter degeneration will be important. These findings may provide parallels for studying neurodegenerative disease, withtraumatic brain injury patients serving as a model for longitudinal investigations, in particular with a view to identifying potential therapeutic interventions.

 

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On October 26, 2012, the peer-reviewed INR scientific article, detailing nearly two years of clinical results utilizing the patented new off-label treatment developed at the INR for chronic neurological impairment following stroke or traumatic brain injury, published. The full-text of the article is available at this link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23100196 .

CNS Drugs. 2012 Oct 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Selective TNF Inhibition for Chronic Stroke and Traumatic Brain Injury : An Observational Study Involving 629 Consecutive Patients Treated with Perispinal Etanercept. Tobinick EKim NMReyzin GRodriguez-Romanacce HDepuy V.

Institute of Neurological Recovery, 100 UCLA Medical Plaza, Suites 205-210, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA, nrimed@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Brain injury from stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) may result in a persistent neuroinflammatory response in the injury penumbra. This response may include microglial activation and excess levels of tumour necrosis factor (TNF). Previous experimental data suggest that etanercept, a selective TNF inhibitor, has the ability to ameliorate microglial activation and modulate the adverse synaptic effects of excess TNF. Perispinal administration may enhance etanercept delivery across the blood-CSF barrier.

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to systematically examine the clinical response following perispinal administration of etanercept in a cohort of patients with chronic neurological dysfunction after stroke and TBI.

METHODS: After approval by an independent external institutional review board (IRB), a chart review of all patients with chronic neurological dysfunction following stroke or TBI who were treated open-label with perispinal etanercept (PSE) from November 1, 2010 to July 14, 2012 at a group medical practice was performed.

RESULTS: The treated cohort included 629 consecutive patients. Charts of 617 patients following stroke and 12 patients following TBI were reviewed. The mean age of the stroke patients was 65.8 years ± 13.15 (range 13-97). The mean interval between treatment with PSE and stroke was 42.0 ± 57.84 months (range 0.5-419); for TBI the mean interval was 115.2 ± 160.22 months (range 4-537). Statistically significant improvements in motor impairment, spasticity, sensory impairment, cognition, psychological/behavioural function, aphasia and pain were noted in the stroke group, with a wide variety of additional clinical improvements noted in individuals, such as reductions in pseudobulbar affect and urinary incontinence. Improvements in multiple domains were typical. Significant improvement was noted irrespective of the length of time before treatment was initiated; there was evidence of a strong treatment effect even in the subgroup of patients treated more than 10 years after stroke and TBI. In the TBI cohort, motor impairment and spasticity were statistically significantly reduced.

DISCUSSION: Irrespective of the methodological limitations, the present results provide clinical evidence that stroke and TBI may lead to a persistent and ongoing neuroinflammatory response in the brain that is amenable to therapeutic intervention by selective inhibition of TNF, even years after the acute injury.

CONCLUSION: Excess TNF contributes to chronic neurological, neuropsychiatric and clinical impairment after stroke and TBI. Perispinal administration of etanercept produces clinical improvement in patients with chronic neurological dysfunction following stroke and TBI. The therapeutic window extends beyond a decade after stroke and TBI. Randomized clinical trials will be necessary to further quantify and characterize the clinical response. PMID: 23100196